Castles & Ancient Sites in South East Ireland
Tintern Abbey, County Wexford

South East Ireland's Castles & Ancient Settlements

Castles & Ancient Settlements South East Ireland

Historically, the ancient port towns of Wexford and Waterford served as entry points for countless invasions. The most deadly of these took place in 1170 under the command of Lord Strongbow. The following year, King Henry of England also landed in Waterford, setting in motion what would become 800 years of British rule in Ireland. Like the ancient settlements that predate them, many of the region's castles and fortifications count among its most popular tourist attractions today.

South East Ireland Castles & Ancient Settlements

Here we take a look at the most popular castles, ruins and ancient sites in Ireland's south-eastern counties.

1 Rock of Cashel

Top Attraction
History & Culture

Ireland has more than its fair share of outstanding archaeological sites, but the Rock of Cashel is arguably the most impressive. The 'rock' from which it takes its name is in fact a limestone hill, covered in luscious green, rising from the plain which characterises the surrounding area. The word 'cashel', by contrast, is derived from the Irish Gaelic word caiseal, meaning stone fortress.

Rock of Cashel, County Tipperary
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History

In both respects, the Rock of Cashel lives up to its title. The rock itself is vast and imposing, and one can only imagine the difficulties it would have posed for attackers throughout the ages who had designs on the stone fortress above. The masonry of the fort itself is no less spectacular and is remarkably well preserved almost a full millennium after its original construction.

The history of the site itself is long and varied. First used as a base for Welsh invaders, the Eóghanachta clan, who would become kings of this region of Ireland. The clan, and hence the rock, have been closely associated with St. Patrick (considered by many historians to be a Welshman), earning Cashel's pseudonym, St. Patrick's Rock.

Although, under Eóghanachta rule, Cashel would rival Tara as Ireland's centre of power, it was wrested from their control in the Tenth Century before being presented to the Church in 1101. The site would change hands many times again in the centuries to follow, giving rise to the various buildings whose remains now occupy it.

Insider Tips

The Rock of Cashel is just a five-minute walk from Cashel town.

2 Kilkenny Castle

Top Attraction
History & Culture

Standing proud on the banks of the River Nore since 1195, Kilkenny Castle is a dominant feature on the landscape of this popular tourist town less than two hours from Dublin. The original fortifications were a wooden structure in the prevailing Normal style of that period. What visitors see today was built throughout the Nineteenth Century and has hosted royalty and nobility since that time.

Kilkenny Castle
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There are extensive grounds which are a must on a warm summer's day. Also, there are several other points of historical interest within easy walking distance, including Talbot's Tower, Madlin Castle and Corner Tower.

Insider Tips

Be sure to stop at the formal Rose Garden with fountains for a group photo before taking the family to the outdoor play area. Afterwards, the grown-ups can refuel with coffee and cakes in the Castle Kitchen.

3 Tintern Abbey

Top Attraction
Religion & Spirituality

Like the Rock of Cashel, Tintern Abbey owes its heritage to Wales, founded as it was by the Earl of Pembroke in the Thirteenth Century for the benefit of its Welsh monk inhabitants. Today, there remains a Welsh counterpart with the same name.

Tintern Abbey, County Wexford
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Much of the original building still stands, including the cloister walls and crossing tower, as well as the chancel and transept chapels. But visitors will enjoy the surroundings at least as much as the abbey itself, with lakes, streams, woods and ruins providing distractions for all age groups. Perhaps most alluring of all is the Colclough Walled Garden, built over 200 years ago and restored since 2010.

Insider Tips

Break up the beautiful walks around the walled gardens with a visit to the tea rooms for coffee and waffles.

4 St Canice's Cathedral

Great for Returners
Religion & Spirituality

With its monumental round tower, St Canice's Cathedral rises majestically above the north of Kilkenny's city centre. Perhaps understandably so: ranking just behind St Patrick's in Dublin, it is Ireland's second-largest medieval cathedral. Gothic in style, it is characterized by its iconic round tower which affords commanding views of the surrounding area. The history of the building itself, long and varied, began - at least according to legend - in the Sixth Century with the establishment of a monastery there by St Canice, Kilkenny's patron saint.

St Canice's Cathedral, County Kilkenny
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Insider Tips

The top of the tower is reachable only by a series of steep staircases. But the view that awaits is worth the effort and the price of admission combined.

5 Jerpoint Abbey

Great for Returners
Religion & Spirituality

Founded in the second half of the Twelfth Century and recently partially restored, Jerpoint Abbey is one of Ireland's finest Cistercian ruins. The main church, with its Romanesque flourishes, dates from these earliest days in the abbey's long history, but visitors will also find additions from the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries. Look out for figures carved into the cloister pillars, some of them quite entertaining.

Ardmore Old Cathedral, County Waterford
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Insider Tips

Drivers should note that the free-to-use car park entrance/exit is on a blind bend. Take care when leaving!

6 Lismore Castle & Gardens

Great for Returners
History & Culture

If you were looking for a single example of what people might expect a picture-postcard Irish castle to look like, Lismore Castle might be the one. Although the original castle dated back to 1185, what visitors see today was in fact built in the early 1800s, so its turrets and towers are in immaculate condition.

Lismore Castle, Waterford
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What might impress visitors rather less is the lack of access, so take note before you make a special trip: you won't be able to go inside the castle itself, the interior spaces of which are closed to the public. You will, however, be able to explore the extensive and ornate gardens which, considered the oldest in Ireland, are arguably worth the trip in themselves, especially for the more green-fingered visitor.

Insider Tips

Photograhy enthusiasts should sure to make their way to the old watch tower at the far corner where great photo opps await.

7 Enniscorthy Castle

Great for Returners
History & Culture

The first stone castle in this location was built in the 1190s by Anglo-Normans whose descendents continued to reside here for 200 years. The structure which tourists and historians visit today was built in the Fifteenth Century and the history of the setting since that time is the story of Ireland itself. The castle was occupied by Cromwellian forces in 1649 and was used as a prison during the 1798 rebellion.

Enniscorthy Castle
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Against this striking historical backdrop, the castle commonly plays host to various exhibitions whose connection to the castle isn't always obvious. Some visitors love this, though some have found it confusing.

Insider Tips

Be sure to ascend to the roof: for many visitors, the views across Enniscorthy are the highlight of their visit.

8 Black Abbey

Religion & Spirituality
History & Culture

First established in 1225AD, Black Abbey was one of the first houses of the Dominican Order in Ireland and is architecturally Normal in style. Historically, "Black Friars" was the term used to describe members of the Dominican Order, and it is from this that the Abbey takes its name. Perhaps the biggest draw for tourist visitors the Abbey is the spectacular Rosary Window in the south transcept. The thirteenth-century alabaster statur of the trinity is no less impressive.

Black Abbey Kilkenny
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Insider Tips

There is car parking outside and admission is free. St Mary's and St Canice's Cathedrals are both within 300 yards. Kilkenny Tourist Office is less than half a mile away.